Azure Compute goes supernova…

Yesterday saw two key announcements on the Azure platform, with the launch of the new Fv2 VM series (officially the fastest on Azure) as well Microsoft sharing details on a partnership being formed with Cray to provide supercomputing capabilities in Azure.

Sun, Explosion, Planet, Moon, Orbit, Solar System

The Fv2 virtual machine addresses the need for large scale computation and runs on the fastest Intel Xeon processors (codenamed Skylake). The specification comes in seven sizes, from 2 vCPU/4Gb through to 72vCPU and 144Gb! The CPUs are hyper-threaded and operate at 2.7Ghz base with a turbo frequency of 3.7Ghz. These types of machines are generally targeted at organisations performing large scale analysis that requires massive compute power. For more details see: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-gb/blog/fv2-vms-are-now-available-the-fastest-vms-on-azure/ Note, at this time the Fv2 is only available in specific regions (West US 2, West Europe and East US)

The more eye-catching announcement was with regards to the partnership with Cray to bring supercomputing capabilities to Azure. A supercomputer is defined as:

A supercomputer is a computer with a high level of computing performance compared to a general-purpose computer. Performance of a supercomputer is measured in floating-point operations per second (FLOPS) instead of million instructions per second (MIPS). As of 2017, there are supercomputers which can perform up to nearly a hundred quadrillions of FLOPS[3], measured in P(eta)FLOPS.[4] The majority of supercomputers today run Linux-based operating systems. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_supercomputing)

Supercomputers have always felt like a bit of a mythical to me – as they have always been out of reach of the general public and the vast majority of organisations. The raw speed of the worlds fastest supercomputers (with China currently leading the road with the Sunway, operating at an insane 93 PFLOPS!) will still be something that is mythical in a sense, however Microsoft Azure is going a long way to bringing some of these capabilities to the Microsoft Azure platform, through their exclusive partnership with Cray.

This partnership is intended to provide access to supercomputing capabilities in Azure for key challenges such as climate modelling, scientific research, etc. It will allow customers to leverage these capabilities as they leverage any other type of Microsoft Azure resource, to help to transform their businesses by harnessing the power of the cloud. Microsoft are hoping this will lead to significant breakthroughs for many organisations as it opens the doors to supercomputing capabilities which will have previously been out of reach.

To read more, please refer to the Microsoft Announcement: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-gb/blog/cray-supercomputers-are-coming-to-azure/

On a closing note, the other key advantage, and one of the key tenets of any cloud computing platform is that these resources are available on a consumption basis – you can use them for as long as you need to use them – without having any up-front capital investment, or having to pay for the time and effort required to build the capability on-premises! This is one of many compelling reasons you should be looking to build a platform like Microsoft Azure into your overall Cloud or IT strategy moving forwards.

If you have any comments or queries about the above, feel free to leave a reply!

%d bloggers like this: